North Carolina

GenX

  • Heather Stapleton, associate professor of environmental ethics and sustainable environmental management. Conducted testing that found relatives of the chemical GenX in Central North Carolina, specifically in Jordan Lake, two of its feeder streams and in Cary’s tap water. She also researches the cancer link to flame retardants. (919) 613-8717; heather.stapleton@duke.edu
  • Lee Ferguson, associate professor of environmental chemistry and engineering. Also conducted testing that found relatives of the chemical GenX in Central North Carolina, specifically in Jordan Lake, two of its feeder streams and in Cary’s tap water. His laboratory is focused on development of novel methods for trace analysis of organic and nanoparticulate contaminants in the aquatic environment. (919) 660-5460; lee.ferguson@duke.edu

Opioids

  • Dr. Lawrence Greenblatt, professor of community and family medicine and co-chair of the Opioid Safety Committee at Duke Health. He is active in statewide policy efforts to stem the trend and improve treatment options. As medical director for Northern Piedmont Community Care in Durham, Greenblatt has seen the growth and spread of the state’s opioid epidemic first-hand through some of his patients. (919) 660-1306; sarah.avery@duke.edu
  • Nicole Schramm-Sapyta, assistant professor of the practice, chief operating officer, Duke Institute for Brain Sciences. Schramm-Sapyta is an expert on drug addiction who recently led research by a student team that analyzed how accidental opioid death rates have shifted among North Carolina counties and moved from prescription medications to street drugs. (919) 684-5187; nicole.schrammsapyta@duke.edu

Politics

  • Pope "Mac" McCorkle, professor of public policy. Specializes in North Carolina politics and elections. He has served as an issues consultant to political candidates, state governments and various organizations for the last two decades. (919) 613-4390, (919) 656-9912 (cell); mac.mccorkle@duke.edu
  • Kerry Haynie, professor of political science. Specializes in state politics, African-American politics, Southern politics, and race and poverty issues. (919) 452-7877; klhaynie@duke.edu

Redistricting

  • Jonathan Mattingly, chair of the Department of Mathematics. His group’s work has been cited in an Amicus brief in Will Gill v. Whitford, which was discussed in oral arguments at the U.S. Supreme Court. His group has also filed a report in the NC General Assembly redistricting case. His recent work includes mathematically investigating gerrymandering. (919) 599-9488 (cell); jonm@math.duke.edu
  • Frederick “Fritz” Mayer, professor of public policy, political science and environment. Mayer teaches a Democracy Lab course in which students devise innovative solutions to gerrymandering and other major political challenges. He is also involved with North Carolina for Redistricting Reform, a bipartisan effort to promote nonpartisan district drawing, and is the director of POLIS: Duke’s Center for Political Leadership, Innovation and Service. (919) 613-9209; frederick.mayer@duke.edu